Bjerknessenteret for klimaforskning er et samarbeid mellom Universitetet i Bergen, NORCE, Nansensenteret og Havforskningsinstituttet. 

Seminar talk: Reduction in ocean heat transport at 26°N since 2008 cools the eastern subpolar gyre of the North Atlantic Ocean  

Harry Bryden from University of Southampton, and staff at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, will give a seminar talk on November 21.

portrait Bryden
Harry Bryden

Short biography:

Harry Bryden, FRS is an American physical oceanographer, professor at University of Southampton, and staff at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton. He is best known for his pioneering work in ocean circulation and in the role of the ocean in the Earth's climate

 

 

Abstract:

Northward ocean heat transport at 26°N has been measured since 2004 by the Rapid project. The ocean heat transport is large, about 1.25PW, and on interannual time scales it exhibits surprisingly large temporal variability. There has been a long term reduction in ocean heat transport of 0.14 PW from 1.32 PW before 2009 to 1.18 PW after 2009 (2009-2015) on an annual average basis associated with a 2.3 Sv drop in the AMOC that has cooled and freshened the upper ocean north of 26°N in a pattern following the offshore edge of the Gulf Stream/North Atlantic Current from the Bahamas to Iceland. Cooling peaks south of Iceland where surface temperatures are as much as 2°C cooler in 2016 than they were in 2008. Heat uptake by the atmosphere appears to have been affected particularly along the path of the North Atlantic Current. For the long-term reduction in ocean heat transport, changes in ocean heat content account for about one-third of the long term reduction in ocean heat transport while reduced heat uptake by the atmosphere appears to account for two-thirds of the change in ocean heat transport.

 

Arranged date for the seminar talk: Nov 21, 2019 at 11:00

Place: Jahnebakken 5, Bjerknes Meeting Room 3180